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(757) 473-0111

5201 Virginia Beach Blvd. Virginia Beach, VA 23462

Mon - Fri: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Sat: 7:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sun: Closed

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Spay/Neuter

Many rabbit owners wonder why their fuzzy little one needs to be spayed or neutered, especially if they have no intentions of bringing home any more rabbits. The reasons may surprise you!

At what age should rabbits be spayed or neutered?

We believe that females can be spayed as soon as they sexually mature, usually between 4–6 months of age. Males can be neutered as soon as the testicles descend, usually around 3-1/2 months of age.

Can you tell if female rabbit has already been spayed?

Sometimes her tummy can be shaved so that we can look for a scar. However, some veterinarians may have used stitching techniques where there is no scar so the only way to definitely know whether a spay has been performed is to proceed with the surgery.

What to Expect Before and After Surgery

It is important for rabbits to eat before surgery. We fast dogs and cats before surgery because they often experience post-anesthesia vomiting. Rabbits cannot vomit, so there is no need to remove food. Also, feeding your bunny before surgery helps the GI tract remain active, which will speed recovery.

Please schedule your surgery on a day where you know that you can spend time closely observing and caring for your rabbit for at least two days. Be aware that we are closed after noon on Saturdays and all day Sunday, so try to choose an appointment early in the week in case your rabbit has complications after surgery.

Surgery Day

The receptionist will have given you a time to bring your bunny in for his or her surgery. The doctor will want to talk to you before you leave, so make sure that you have some morning time to spend here at Pet Care. Also, you will be asked to sign a surgery consent form. We encourage you to bring some of your rabbit's favorite foods/treats so that we can feed him or her once he or she wakes up. You may also bring along some of your bunny's hay. Put the hay in a plastic bag with your rabbit's name on it. If your rabbit is bonded and you are concerned about the separation, please bring this up with the doctor.

Spay Surgery

The licensed veterinary technician assigned to the doctor performing your rabbit's spay will give her a combination of injectable and gas anesthetics to induce sleep. Also, a combination of long-lasting analgesics will be given to prevent any pain. Once asleep, the hair will be shaved from the surgical site, and the area will be surgically prepared. Your doctor will make an incision through the skin and abdominal wall. The points where the ovaries and two uterine horns attach will be tied off, cut, and removed. After the incision has been closed, the technician will use our laser therapy machine to promote healing and minimize discomfort.

After Surgery Care at Home

Your little one probably will not want to have much to do with you after her surgery. As hard as it may be, try not to hover over her or attempt to pet or cuddle her. She needs rest and confinement for at least three to four days. If she is part of a pair or bonded group, it is fairly safe to return her to her normal environment. If you notice that her partner or friends are being too rough or playful, you may need to temporarily separate them for a while. Make sure they can still see, smell, hear, and touch each other or the bond may soon break down.

Neuter Surgery

The licensed veterinary technician assigned to the doctor performing your rabbit's neuter will give him a combination of injectable and gas anesthetics to induce sleep. Also, a combination of long-lasting analgesics will be given to prevent any pain. As with a spay, the hair will be shaved from the surgical site, and the area will be surgically prepared. An incision will be made in front of the scrotum. The testicle will be brought through the incision, the spermatic cord will be ligated, and then the testicle will be removed. The second testicle may be brought out through the same incision or a second one, and the procedure repeated. The incision is closed with absorbable sutures. The incision is then lasered to speed healing and minimize stress and discomfort.

After Surgery Care at Home

Because a neuter is usually not an invasive surgery, little boys are up and eating soon afterwards. Your bunny might not want to move around much for the first 24 hours but, regardless, keep him quiet and confined for at least one to two days post-surgery. Check the incision for signs of swelling, bleeding, or discharge. If you notice anything that concerns you, please call us (757) 473-0111.

Please keep in mind that the level of testosterone will still remain high for several weeks to two months after surgery. Keep your male away from any unspayed females, as there is still live sperm in the reproductive tract. This sperm will take several weeks to die.

Remember: Contact us if any of the following occurs:

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